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Tired: using the πŸ˜‚ emoji to advertise a #comedy show. Wired: using the πŸ† emoji to advertise a vegetable show.

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Went rollerskating for the first time in forever for New Years Eve. Surprised how much came back, and not surprised that I still stop with a wall.

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It’s that time of year again…where seemingly all the lotion in the world can’t keep me moisturized.

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I finally splurged for a pre-built Ferris split keyboard - I’ve been using a Ferris-inspired keymap on my ErgoDox for a few years. I’ll still need to solder the keyswitches, which I’m nervous about. I soldering a macropad and I only got 50% of the switches to work. ⌨️

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The first snow of the year is falling in New York City today. Feeling cozy. 🌨️

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TIL there’s a movement to refer to Neovim/Vim as a PDE, or Personalized Development Environment, instead of a text editor. “Text editor” can be confused with categorically different editors like Notepad++, while PDE indicates the deep personalization and power available.

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πŸ“š Listened to the short story I Was A Teenage Space Jockey by Stephen Graham Jones on the Levar Burton Reads podcast. Effecting, intense, and full of texture.

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Until estimating is on a sounder basis, individual managers will need to stiffen their backbones and defend their estimates with the assurance that their poor hunches are better than wish-derived estimates.
β€”Frederick P. Brooks

The Mythical Man Month was written in 1974, and it still feels like despite our many new techniques, the software industry’s estimation hasn’t evolved much past “defend an educated hunch”.

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πŸ“š Started reading: The Mythical Man-Month, by Frederick P. Brooks Jr. I never read this often-discussed collection of essays on computer programming management. Excited to dive in. I had it on my reading list before Frederick Brooks’ passing, but death has a way of re-arranging priorities.

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πŸ“š Finished reading: The Number Ones by Tom Breihan. I don’t respond to top 40 music in any era, but the stories are almost always fun and interesting, and the history of popular musical taste is fascinating. Tom Beihan writes so you can hear.

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